November 12, 2001
Issue


 

COVER
   

Guru of Joy?
The fastest growing guru in the marketplace of happiness is presiding over an empire of air-and breathing with him are the despairing and the dandy in over 135 countries.

 
PAKISTAN
   

Tussle Within
As the war drags on, the US discovers the perils of allying with a dictator who wants to appear a statesman abroad and a politician at home.

 
WAR-DIARY
 

Battle Weary Wasteland
An exclusive photo feature captures images of Afghan life during unending conflict.

 
ECONOMY
 

Down and Out
An account of sebi's undoing under D.R. Mehta and the tasks for a new team that will be at the helm in the regulatory body early next year.

 
OTHER STORIES
     
 



 
 
Home 
 
 

EYECATCHERS

Bridal Blush

So gutsy ramp regular Madhu Sapre is finally married. Her liaison and messy break-up with model Milind Soman attracted more editorial publicity than her two-year romance with Italian businessman Gian Maria Emendatori. Family and close friends who attended the low-key register marriage at Sapre's Mumbai home last month will also be a part of a traditional Hindu ceremony on November 18. "Our relationship grew inside airports and cars, since we are both always on the move," says Sapre. "I think it's going to be pretty much the same now." There's good news for Sapre fans though. Emendatori "does not mind" her modelling. But wonder if she will be such a ramp regular now.

Dreaming Mumbai

Winning crowns is becoming a habit with Indians worldwide. Praveen Sian, 25, a sales officer in London, was judged winner of the newly instituted Miss India UK contest in Leicester last week. The unpardonably predictable expressions of surprise, shock and ecstasy later, Sian said: "I feel a great sense of responsibility to show what the British Asian woman can achieve." The Miss India Worldwide contest in California in March is next, but Sian hopes to use the crown as a ticket to the Indian entertainment industry. Should that read Bollywood?

Goodwill Hunting

I don't practise my lines for interviews," insists Gladrags Manhunt 2001 winner Rajeev Singh. Yet, in one breath, he parrots off particulars in his CV: "I am from Jaipur, 24, 6'1'' tall, into bodybuilding and will be leaving for the International Manhunt Contest in Beijing." And oh, he has worked as a buyer for an international import company in Malta for three and half years. The rhetoric also includes a break in Bollywood-in debutant director Chandrakant's Fashion Street, a film on "the darker realms of fashion", also starring Jackie Shroff and Paresh Rawal. "I am not a typical model-model," says Singh, "so audiences will be able to relate to me." Arjun Rampal has some stiff competition coming.

Stage Run

In the temperamental world of fashion, Suvarchala Narayanan, 20, would have been just another caked-up face in the greenroom. But last month, Narayanan surprised friends-and herself-turning in a laudable performance on the Mumbai stage as the sultry Nina in Vincent Geoffrey's An Evening to Remember. While Narayanan continues her march on the country's ramps, her soul, she insists, is in theatre. She's also penning scripts these days. Next stop: "Alternate cinema".


 
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     METRO TODAY
 
   

MetroScape

Shoot and Run
For three years, Kolkata filmmakers Soumitra Dastidar and Kingshuk Ray, chased every shopkeeper, mason and paanwallah in Raipur with the same question: did they know where the People's War Group (PWG) camp was?
more...

Looking Glass

Banglore: Pub

Delhi: Furniture Store

Kolkata: Restaurant

 
    Web Exclusives
DESPATCHES
  With foodgrain prices crashing and debts mounting, farmers in Kerala are now resorting to suicide. Is there no lasting solution to the grassroots problem, asks India Today Principal Correspondent M.G. Radhakrishnan
Dying Fields

 
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